REMOVING LEADING

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  • Last Post 14 November 2016
joeb33050 posted this 24 April 2014

REMOVING LEADING               I very seldom get leading in a rifle barrel; the sign of leading is big groups with wild shots. Leading can be removed easily with the “Kleen Bore” yellow patches-tight; with Kroil  or paint thinner or turpentine on a TIGHT patch-pushed through so it squeaks; or with 000 steel wool or bronze/copper wool on a brush.             Last week I had to try the new NOE .228-72 mold bullets even though the lube/size die is under construction. I got gas checks on, lubed by hand, loaded 30, went to the range and leaded the .223 Rem. barrel.             My lead removal methods require an undersized brush, .270 or 7mm for a .30, for example. I don't have an undersized brush for 22 cal, didn't want to fiddle with jags etc., so I went to an old trick that I've never written down.             I loaded some cases with 7.5 Unique, Cream of Wheat and a dab of grease to hold the COW in the case. After shooting 10 of these the rifle shot 5 five shot 100 yard groups with 225646 averaging 1.6", about as well as it has ever done. The leading was gone. I shot the rest of the COW loads during the session to get rid of them.             Cream of Wheat loaded this way will clean the lead out of any barrel I've tried it in, with no problems.

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onondaga posted this 24 April 2014

Hi Joe,

I believe the COW as you use it is cleaning lead out by simple abrasion.

Getting under lead with a solvent allows it to be loosened and wiped out, abrasion removes lead by breaking it up and scrubbing it out. Abrasion or solvent or both are the most common successful ways to remove lead.

The manufacturer of one of the Ballistic Fillers I use claims their filler, Precision Reloaders Spherical Buffer removes lead by it's harmless to barrel abrasion of lead.

Gary

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TRKakaCatWhisperer posted this 24 April 2014

onondaga wrote: ... I believe the COW as you use it is cleaning lead out by simple abrasion.

... Gary
  Agree.  Grits appear to be more abrasive and are cheaper by a long shot.  

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badammo posted this 24 April 2014

Someone finally came up with a good use for grits.

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giorgio de galleani posted this 25 April 2014

I 'am using “polenta bramata” that is large granules ground corn for buffer over black powder in muzzle loading guns ,or for filler for black powder cartridges for cowboy loads.

 I hope some American with Italian chromosomes explain  me exactly what  “grits” are. 

In the web I got descriptions of different cereal grits.

Polenta is the best death bed of the beloved boar stew.

This method of  barrel cleaning is very clever.

And some shooters use COW ( and other  ground cereal ) en lieu of bullet lube , with success.

I deeply  hate creame of wheat (semolino) because mother used to give it to us  boys when we were ill. It is a typical hospital meal. 

Here are some booty waiting for the pot on the woodstove.

Shot with cast bullets of course.

giorgio de galleani posted this 25 April 2014

Made a mistake posting the picture.

These are the tracks on the paved road ,made by a small sow with buth sear knees broken by a 45/70 slug.

She was retrieved in the nearby brusk by a beagle hound.  

TRKakaCatWhisperer posted this 25 April 2014

from Wikipedia, “Grits refers to a ground-corn food of Native American origin, that is common in the Southern United States and eaten mainly at breakfast. Modern grits are commonly made of alkali-treated corn known as hominy."

White or yellow. Instant or traditional (cook for 20 minutes or more) Good with butter, salt & pepper. Some Yankees try sugar - not good by anyone's account.

Coarsely ground. Tough.

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joeb33050 posted this 25 April 2014

I believe that “grits” is a southern americanization of the word “groats", the English word that refers to grain eaten as grain-not bread. Or cake. “Polenta” is the Italian word for corn meal, and is the primary cause of young Italians leaving home. “Groats” is reflected in the phrase “John O' Groats", the furthest north point on the british isle. The extremes of britain are “Lands End to John O Groats". I have found that since taking etymology courses, at night, that my average group size with defective cast bullets has fallen 4.665%. Your mileage-but not the mileage from Land's end to ...” may differ.

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onondaga posted this 25 April 2014

The American"Fried Grits” or “Fried Mush” recipe of cooking grits with water till thickened then pouring into a loaf pan to cool over nite and then slicing  the loaf for frying the strips is identical to polenta. I am an American of Sicilian decent  and like both grits and polenta for many recipes.. Sea salt, garlic and hot pepper seasoned  Fried Mush strips, fried with butter or olive oil and  topped with Maple Syrup is a common side dish with served with scrambled eggs or egg omelet and bacon. Polenta or fried mush is also terrific with illegal fried whale blubber.

Gary

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joeb33050 posted this 25 April 2014

onondaga wrote: The American"Fried Grits” or “Fried Mush” recipe of cooking grits with water till thickened then pouring into a loaf pan to cool over nite and then slicing  the loaf for frying the strips is identical to polenta. I am an American of Sicilian decent  and like both grits and polenta for many recipes.. Sea salt, garlic and hot pepper seasoned  Fried Mush strips, fried with butter or olive oil and  topped with Maple Syrup is a common side dish with served with scrambled eggs or egg omelet and bacon. Polenta or fried mush is also terrific with illegal fried whale blubber.

Gary Gsry;Don't be hasty! What you describe is “hasty pudding", from Harvard and other american places. Grits are/am/is grits, -white-tasteless-gooey, grits. But, cooled in a pan, sliced and fried is hasty pudding. Maple syrup or savory flavors. Polenta recipes generally start:"Bring 4 pounds of lard to a rolling boil..."The Harvard people are watching! 

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bandmiller2 posted this 13 September 2014

Grits are course ground hominy that, large corn treated with lye. I'am a yankee but sometimes enjoy grits. Hard to resist not putting brown sugar and milk in them though. Frank C.

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Bohica793 posted this 13 September 2014

I eat grits damn near every morning for breakfast. Salt, pepper, butter -- nothing else.  In fact, just finished eating a bowl as I type this.  Only a Yankee would put sugar on them.....

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Brodie posted this 13 September 2014

Giorgio;  “Grits” are American polenta bramata, treated so that they swell up. Brodie

B.E.Brickey

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bandmiller2 posted this 30 September 2014

I can't recall having a leading problem in any of my rifles. Simple solvent on a patch seems to handle it. I do like the Kleen-Bore yellow cloth cut into patches on a jag, they must be a fine abrasive as they polish the bore. For the average joe occasional use will help the bore, someone who cleans a lot mayby not. Frank C.

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Pentz posted this 30 September 2014

IMO grits are best when left on the shelf. Personally, 'wipe out patch out” works best for me. No way I'm sending COW or other material down my sacred bores.

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codarnall posted this 11 May 2015

The Lewis Lead remover uses a fine bronze mesh and a mating puck to draw through the barrel. Likely 90 percent of the lead is removed on the first draw, then every next draw is easier and cleans out the rest out by the third pull. It leading is a problem that you haven't solved yet then the gadget is a God send.

Charlie

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codarnall posted this 27 May 2016

Recently I have learned that peroxide and vinegar together will oxidize lead fouling but really only for stainless guns only. On further research that combination yields dangerous fumes and can damage blue metal. Doing a google search about the concoction is highly advised.- Charlie

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onondaga posted this 27 May 2016

codarnall wrote: Recently I have learned that peroxide and vinegar together will oxidize lead fouling but really only for stainless guns only. On further research that combination yields dangerous fumes and can damage blue metal. Doing a google search about the concoction is highly advised.- Charlie

Really? You would do all that stuff to avoid getting your bullets to fit and a load balanced charge to stop leading. I could never get that emotionally attached to poor fitting bullets that I would tolerate leading and put up with the mess of it and removing it.

There has been plenty of helpful advice here on this forum to completely stop leading. Is getting bullets to fit an objectionable stress for you? It is not that hard man. I cast and shoot 100 pounds of lead a year, I really enjoy all my cast shooting rifles and none of them lead up. I don't get it, you are really skipping the basics if you get leading or your barrels are either just trashed and too rough. But even most horrible barrels are completely fixable with a little bore polishing and bullets that fit.

Gary

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Myflatline posted this 29 May 2016

GRITS means Girls raised in the South.  So eat your grits.For lead removal, Chore Boy copper pads do a great job .

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OU812 posted this 12 November 2016

Hoppes Elite does a good job of removing embedded lead. Run a wet patch followed by a dry patch and let gun set a couple of days. Inspecting with bore scope will reveal curled up whiskers of lead in the barrel. Push another patch down barrel to remove lead...patch will be very gray lead color.

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onondaga posted this 13 November 2016

OU812 wrote: Hoppes Elite does a good job of removing embedded lead. After cleaning barrel I apply a thin coating with patch and allow to work a day or two. Inspecting with bore scope will reveal curled up whiskers of lead in the barrel. Push another patch down barrel to remove lead...patch will be very gray lead color. I like the Hoppe's Elete also and have both the pump spray and the gel. The gel stays wet for hours if you mop it in heavy and I really like it in my muzzle loading rifles for a solvent after a long bench session. It leaves a protective lube coat  you swab it out and leave the bore damp with it,

A wetting for 2 minutes and a swab out twice cleans anything out of my ML rifle bores excellently and leaves a rust protective.

The stuff has virtually no odor and is fine to use in your home and no one will complain about any odor like #9 has. Hoppe's Elite is my favorite. I use it in my cartridge guns also and it is terrific.

Gary

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Myflatline posted this 13 November 2016

Man #9 is my Cologne... Love that smell , haven't seem the Elite in the stores here yet.

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OU812 posted this 13 November 2016

Myflatline wrote: Man #9 is my Cologne... Love that smell , haven't seem the Elite in the stores here yet. Walmart sells the small pump bottle along with the Elite oil.

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rockquarry posted this 13 November 2016

Must agree with the Chore Boy suggestion for bad leading. Otherwise a bronze brush is fine.

As for grits, to keep them from being just a dull breakfast...a little margarine or butter, coarse ground black pepper, pepperjack cheese, and sliced pickled jalapenos.

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 13 November 2016

fwiw i used a bronze brush wrapped in 3x or 4x steel wool for thousands of shots through my 222 .... went about 30000 shots before it went over 1 moa .... that was mostly for copper fouling but the abrasive wear ( none ) was the same .

don't use rusty steel wool .

but chore boy copper wool sounds even better .

my load was 24 gr. ball-c and hornady 50 gr. sx .... slightly below max pressure. never hot barrel .

for my 22 match barrels with moly i just pushed an oily rag through about every 200 shots .

ken,

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 13 November 2016

grits/cornmeal/oatmeal ::

add handful of raisins with maple syrup poured over it ....serve with heavily buttered lightly toasted french/homemade/wheat bread . makes for friendlier day .

ken

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OU812 posted this 14 November 2016

If you see gray streaks in the muzzle end of barrel, you have lots more in the breach end of bore. Scrubbing the bore with abrasive pastes and liquids works, along with a new STIFF brass brush and solvents. It has taken me up to one hour of scrubbing to get carbon and lead fouling out of bore. My Hawkeye Bore scope reveals fouling.

So if you have a rifle that is shooting a little worse than it used to, maybe a good cleaning of bore is needed to return lost accuracy.

...

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