Unertl Scope Mount

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  • Last Post 28 September 2014
Hook posted this 21 September 2014

As there is not an optics forum here, I decided to post this in the Single Shot Rifle Forum since it is on a Stevens 44 1/2 rifle. The Unertl is a 10X with external adjustments in the scope rings and a 7/8” tube. I acquired this package two weeks ago and have had zero experience with either the scope or Stevens.

 

My question concerns scope adjustment. The wheels seen in the photo do not have clicks or markings to help the shooter change scope settings for different distances. Are there parts missing from this rear scope ring or is it intended to be set for one distance and left alone? If necessary, where can a find a rear ring that can be continually adjusted for different ranges?

 

Any help or advice would be appreciated.

 

http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Hook67/media/unertlmount_zps6833ce71.jpg.html>

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 21 September 2014

here's what i would do: get a set of calipers ( ebay or harbor freight for $12 ) then measure how far an adjustment screw moves for exactly one turn.

the impact change per turn will be magnified by the ratio of the distance between the mounts to the target . example: for 100 yards ( 300 ft or 3600 inches ) if the mounts are 12 inches apart, the impact will be 300 times the travel of the adjust screw. as a guess, your mounts are 8 inches apart, so the impact will change 450 times your adjustment travel. if you move the adjust 0.001, the crosshairs will move 0.45 inch at 100 yards. touchy, heh ? makes ya wonder how we ever hit anything at 400 yards !!


or you could just shoot a 10 shot group, move an adjust screw a half turn and see how far it moves ...

or if you have a rifle vice and a helper person, , mark the crosshairs spot on a target at 100 yards, the move the adjust screw 1 turn and mark that spot on the target.

or, ship that 44 1/2 to me, i will calibrate the scope and get it back to you in a couple three years ... ( g ) .


there is a 44 stevens running around at gun shows in no. iowa ...$400 but it's been modified .. a friend bot it as a proclaimed 44 1/2 but when i told him it was a glorified stevens favorite he ” convinced ” the seller to take it back. it originally was a 25 rimfire but was butchered into something else. still would be a fun project if i didn't have about 37 of them lined up already.

ken

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joeb33050 posted this 21 September 2014

I think the rear mount was designed that way. I've seen such in the distant past.The conventional distance between mounts is 7.2"The adjustment screw is threaded 40 turns per inch, therefore 1 turn = .025"With 7.2” spacing, one turn moves the bullet 12.5” at 100 yards. If your spacing between mounts is other than 7.2": call the spacing “S" Divide 3600 by S.  Multiply the result by .025.  Get the movement of the bullet with 1 revolution at 100 yards  EX: S = 9",  3600/9 = 400,  400 X .025 = 10",  1 revolution moves the bullet 10” at 100 yards Put a piece of masking tape on the adjustment screws, draw a line or two on the tape, you'll be able to adjust the scope fine. Practice will help.  joe b.

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onondaga posted this 21 September 2014

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/forum/view_user.php?id=40>Ken Camphttp://www.castbulletassoc.org/forum/view_user.php?id=40>bell Iowa

I have used this mount and the easiest way to figure out what it does is to get the rifle sighted roughly in to hit on a big paper with a small 1” bull at 100 yards with a 3X3' paper. shoot a group and mark group center, then take one half turn adjustment on the mount. shoot another group and mark the center. Measure distance center to center between the groups and make your own chart. for example you may end up with something like 1/4 turn equals 2” at 100 Yards. It will be half of that at 50 yards etc. Just see what you get with your setup and forget the math.

Gary

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Hook posted this 21 September 2014

Thank you for the responses. I already have the rifle rough zeroed at 100 yds, and I can find out what # of turns it takes to move the POI to other ranges as Onondaga pointed out. My problem is that without clicks and/or markings, there is no way I can depend on repeatability or even knowing where the POI is set after not using the rifle for a while. I was hoping that there might be add-on graduated knobs or such that could be used somewhat like the vernier on a soule sight.

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onondaga posted this 21 September 2014

http://castbulletassoc.org/forum/view_user.php?id=8151>Hook

Repeatability with this mount is directly related to your eye/hand skill level. There is no way around that. Develop a routine with the locking screw. I would loosen it the amount of the planned adjustment plus 1/4 turn, make your adjustment and snug up the lock to the same amount of hand snug every time. You can actually learn to like an external adjustment scope mount without clicks if you become very consistent with your eye/hand skill adjustment. The absence of clicks is actually a plus benefit to me and I miss my old Unertl stuff! The precise fine threads fit well and have no play, you can take good advantage of that with practice. The Unertl quality makes the effort well worth it.

Gary

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John Grantham posted this 22 September 2014

Contact Dewayne Grinner at unertl.alexweb.net He should be of assistance.  John

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Hook posted this 22 September 2014

Thanks, John.....I have sent an email to Mr. Grinner. And thanks again to all of you for your comments and information.

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joeb33050 posted this 22 September 2014

A dial indicator and a tube-like adapter would allow measuring and recording and setting the sights.Here's an inexpensive dial indicator: http://www.harborfreight.com/1-inch-travel-machinists-dial-indicator-623.html

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rockquarry posted this 22 September 2014

From the photo, that appears to be what Unertl referred to as a “dehorned” mount, though your depiction is a bit different than what is shown in a Unertl brochure from years ago.

While more difficult to adjust, the dehorned mount was more compact and obviously not as delicate for field use as the standard protruding thimble adjustment.

It's hard to tell from the catalog photo, but it looks as if there is some sort of hex nut or cover over the exposed threads as shown in your photo. Others may know more about this.

I've been a Unertl user for a long time and the dehorned mounts seem to be far less common than the standard ones.

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EdS posted this 28 September 2014

I believe there should be some sort of “hex nut or cover” on the exposed threads. This would be used to lock the adjustments after zeroing. -Ed

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