Fouling Shot article glitch

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  • Last Post 15 February 2016
Glenn R. Latham posted this 15 March 2015

Folks, There was a small portion of Ed Wosika's paper patch article in issue #234 that was inadvertently chopped out.  Here is the fix:

The end of page 234-13 ends with the phrase, “edge-on to the hypotenuse of the triangle,” and that sentence (to the reader) resumes at the top of page 234-14 with the phrase, “the left and up against the fixed edge of the paper cutter,”.  The missing text (from between those two phrases) is shown bolded, below, together with the plain-text lead-in and lead-out:  “With the blade of the cutter fully lifted, put a stapled three-strip-stack edge-on to the hypotenuse of the triangle, with the stapled end to the left. Slide the strip stack to the right and up-against the hypotenuse of the triangle until both of the corners of the stack (on the right end) extend just beyond the blade, as shown in Figure 4. Cut off both protruding corners. You are now ready to cut finished trapezoidal strips by the handful. Put a mark on your wooden pencil a distance from the end of the eraser equal to the desired patch length on the bullet plus 40% of the bullet diameter, as shown in the left image in Figure 4. Thus, for a 0.7-inch long patch in 30-caliber, the mark would be 0.712-inch from the end of the eraser <(0.7+(0.4x0.3) = (0.7+0.012) = 0.712>. The idea is to have the patch extend beyond the base of the PPCB core enough to not quite reach the center of the bullet when you fold the extending skirt over the base of the bullet and apply the pleating. To measure the width of each stack of three patches, prior to cutting it off, hold the pencil with the eraser end to . . .the left and up against the fixed edge of the paper cutter, right where the just-cut end of the stack-of-three is located. Slide the stack-of-three out until its extending edge meets your reference mark (on the pencil), as shown in the middle image in Figure 4.”

Glenn R. Latham, Editor

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tturner53 posted this 15 March 2015

Thanks Glen. I read that article twice. I believe it's the answer to my quest for a power house cb load for silhouettes but I must admit the detailed instructions are a challenge for a simple hacker like me. Ed, if you're out there how about a u-tube video?

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Glenn R. Latham posted this 16 March 2015

tturner53, I don't know if Ed does forums but I sent him your request.

Glenn

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POTATO JOHN posted this 18 March 2015

He also uses a wrong term. He calls the patch a trapazoid when it is clearly a parallegram. A trapazoid has only one set of parallel sides while a parallelagram has two sets. Trapazoids would cause an unbalanced bullet.

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Glenn R. Latham posted this 19 March 2015

John, you're right, I caught that when I was editing it, but somehow the change didn't happen.

Glenn

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tturner53 posted this 20 March 2015

We're going to make him mad if this keeps up! I was fascinated by the article, just not able to “get it” just yet. Paper patching is obviously the solution to my need for a cast load in something like a M39 or old Mauser for silhouettes.

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POTATO JOHN posted this 20 March 2015

I agree, the approach and the article are the best I have ever read. (Sorry, Mathews)  But like you, I just didn't get it. The photos and the words just didn't match, so I had to comment. My problem is to patch for a .45 Gibbs muzzleloader without a false muzzle. one shot-one squirrel! I remember those days before SBdo Co poisoned them all and then made No Shooting zones all over.) Potato John -ex West End member, now I shoot in Medford for $15 dollars a year on 11 ranges

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tturner53 posted this 21 March 2015

I'm just saying I'm a little too simple to follow such detailed instructions. I know there's many CBA members who are ready and willing to do the work it takes to make a match winning load.

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Brodie posted this 21 March 2015

I haven't read the article, but assuming that the weapon in question (45 gibbs?) uses a conical bullet:  .1 size the bullet down 4x the thickness of the paper to be used.  2. Patch the bullet.  3. size the patched bullet so that it will go down the bore without tearing.  4. Load and shoot. If it uses a ball: 1. Lay two strips of paper across the bore of the charged (no ball) weapon. 2. Push a ball down the bore taking the paper with it. 3. Prime and shoot. Brodie

B.E.Brickey

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Dirtybore posted this 15 August 2015

In my opinion it was a nice review and a rewrite of the article in TFS #216, “Paper Patch Bullets in Black Powder Cartridges, For Beginners", by John Rhodes. Both authors covered the same information, just used different techniques. Naturally, John's article was geared towards large caliber black powder cartridges but the information and techniques could also be used with smaller caliber bullets and smokeless loads too. It was unfortunate that part of Ed Wosika's article was left out. Personally, I enjoyed Ed's article. Those two authors with those two articles have touched on a topic we seldom see in writing much less in the pages of TFS.

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Ed Harris posted this 15 August 2015

With my arthritis I gave up paper patching bullets smaller than .40 caliber.

For a full house silhouette load I think what I use in my Garand would be a good start.  This is an ordinary rack-grade CMP M1, not accurized.  Ordinary LC once-fired Ball M2 cases, not match prepped. Bullets cast 50-50 wheelweights and linotype cast from a gang mold, sight culled only, Hornady GC, sized .311", Lee stick 50-50 Alox-Beexwax in lube and crimp groove, then light overcoat all over with 50-50 Lee Liquid Alox diluted with mineral spirits. Load is 40 grains IMR4064, Winchester primers, 2220 fps.  NO LEADING and the gun runs like a pony trotting. Does about 1-1/2 to 2 moa from my Mauser bolt-action deer rifle with 4X scope.  

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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tturner53 posted this 16 August 2015

That's the ticket! What bullet? It looks like a 160 gr.? I have a good supply of 4064. Good stuff. Will your M1's sights make it to 500m with this load?

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Ed Harris posted this 17 August 2015

My .312-160-5 design, available from Accurate, Lee, NOE, HM2, etc.

Yes, no trouble having enough sight elevation.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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oldblinddog posted this 15 February 2016

Which Accurate mold would that be?

USMC (ret.), CBA, NRA, TSRA, ARPC

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Ed Harris posted this 15 February 2016

oldblinddog wrote: Which Accurate mold would that be? Accurate 31-165B is close, but his customers didn't understand the tapered nose and went for a conventional two-diameter bore-riding nose, which is not true to my original design.   The HM2 and NOE versions more closely follow my original drawings and have the tapered nose which matches the 7.62x39 throat angle. 

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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oldblinddog posted this 15 February 2016

That's why I asked. I had seen the NOE mould and knew it to be a close copy. Since  like iron mould blocks I will see if I can get Tom to re-do it for me so that it is correct.

USMC (ret.), CBA, NRA, TSRA, ARPC

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Ed Harris posted this 15 February 2016

Here is the HM2 drawing based on my original design with very minor changes to suit theirmanufacturing process:

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

jeff houck posted this 15 February 2016

What is the web address for Heavy Metal Molds?

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Ed Harris posted this 15 February 2016

My link for HM2 no longer works.

I recommend contacting Swede Nelson at NOE because he has the drawings and had made several versions for various group buys, some having tweaks which the group buy people wanted, or you can get my original design.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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