Wild goose recipe.

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  • Last Post 05 October 2012
Flashman posted this 24 October 2009

     The wild goose I've tried is virtually unedible. I've tried different marinades and cooking methods. No matter what I do it tastes like rotten liver and the longer it cooks the tougher and drier it gets. Any suggestions?

      We are overun with these darn winged rats. They need thinned out a little but we hate to shoot stuff we can't eat!

Flashman  

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Lillard posted this 25 October 2009

Cut the meat off the bone and in to strips (like chicken fingers). Beat it with a meat hammer, salt, pepper, flour, and fry it tast alot like dove. I do not pick them just skin them I start in the center of the breast and pull the skin down to expose the breast and legs. 

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JSH posted this 25 October 2009

Treat it like a tough cut of lean beef. Cooked low and slow. I have been shooting geese(canadas) for 25 years and have only had a few that I deemed nasty. Save the legs and thighs too.

1-2 skinned goose breast What ever your favorite season for beef 1 onion 1 bell pepper 1 can beef broth 1 can beer

Put seasoning on breast (be creative, try what ever you would use on beef). Put breast in roaster bone down slice onion and pepper into strips and rings. Lay these on top of the breast. pour broth and beer in bottom of pan, not over breat. Seal up good with aluminum foil. 9wanting the steam) Bake in the oven at 250-300 for 2-3 hours. Or when meat draws back from the breast bone. Let it rest for 10-20 minutes before removing from bone and slicing. Taste pretty close to beef or venison. Our birds here have a pretty good grain diet, so that may have somthing to do with yours?

Do the above same with legs and thighs. Simmering on stove top with spices in water will also work. Cook till tender and meat falls from the bone. You may have to strip the membrane from the muscle, but meat will be tender. Use broth to boil reams egg noodles or home made and get after it. Jeff fyi, i fixed a big batch of noodles and guys at work swore it was beef

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josber posted this 20 September 2010

put a goose on a board and roast in the oven at 325 until you can stick a fork in the board.Through the goose away and eat the board.

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gnoahhh posted this 20 September 2010

I love Canada Goose and don't find it to be offensive any way it's cooked. My favorite though is to smoke one or two geese in a hickory/cherry fueled smoker. Then I de-bone them and throw the carcasses in a huge stock pot and simmer to create a stock for vegetable soup. Throw out the spent carcass and build the soup as you normally would, adding the smoked meat. Wonderful smoky flavored goose veggie soup.

My hunting buddy uses the legs of the geese we shoot to make large batches of goose gumbo which he passes around.

Take a goose breast and slice into chicken finger-sized strips and marinate  overnight in Ken's Ranch Dressing. Sear on a hot grill, and use more Ken's Ranch Dressing as a condiment.

Finally, when all I want to do is cook one and eat it, I stick it in a countertop rotisserie for 1.25 hour. Slice the breast into sandwiches. A good South Carolina mustard-based BBQ sauce as a condiment is superb on a goose breast sandwich.

Another guy has his geese made up into goose sausage and goose baloney by the same guy who processes our deer. Try it!

The biggest mistake in cooking a goose, no matter which approach, is to overcook it. Treat it like a piece of prime tender beef and you won't go wrong. Even I can't abide a piece of leathery well done goose (or beef for that matter) that's been cooked to death.

We shoot hundreds of geese off of my buddy's farms on the Eastern Shore every year. You can bet none of them go to waste!

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Ed Harris posted this 28 September 2010

Skin goose, put in copper boiler with 1 tsp of salt and enough water to cover. Insert an egg-sized granite creek stone and simmer 1 hour. Continue to simmer covered and add beer as needed to maintain the liquid level. When the stone is fork tender throw away the goose and drink the gravy. Just kidding.

Use your favorite potroast or sauerbratten recipe.

Skin goose, put in LARGE crock pot with 1/2 cup of cider vinegar, 1 envelope of Lipton or Knorr dry onion soup mix, 1 bay leaf, ten peppercorns, 1/2 tsp of dill, 1 quart of beer, 4 carrots, 4 stalks of celery, 4 beets, 4 onions, and one cabbage cut into quarters. Boiled potatoes, hot bread fresh out of the oven or buttered noodles served on the side if desired. Simmer covered until you can remove the bones from pot, about 4 hours. Thicken gravy if desired and serve with hot bread, potatoes or buttered noodles and chilled dark beer.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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argie1891 posted this 28 September 2010

we cooked a goose last winter and the dog spit it out. i am not kidding our lab picked up a piece of goose and actually got it out of his mouth as fast as he could. he wouldnt go near that piece of meat. it was so bad that we ordered a pizza and threw the goose in the trash. joe gifford aka argie1891

if you need me I will be at the range

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ex-guard posted this 14 October 2010

marinate breast in Lawry's herb and garlic w/lemon juice and smoke it . first goose i liked

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1kshooter posted this 26 June 2011

to all the (can't stand it guys) my wife is a little bit picky about game tast and this is a sure fire ..if you don'tlike it ..you are a vegan lol 2lbs ground goose brest with 1 lb ground pork 1tsp salt 1tsp black pepper 1tsp crushed red pepper(medheat) 1tbsp fennel seed 1tbsp garlic powder combine and stuff into caseings or make burrgers or use instead of ground beef in any dish ..stuffed peppers ...chili ..meatloaf are some of my favs...the kids go nuts for taco's with it

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Mike Kallam posted this 04 February 2012

I grind the majority of all my ducks and geese. Since they are such a dark meat, I throw in a little pheasant, rabbit, turkey, to “balance” it out. I mix in a little pork fat and make sausage. I get my bulk sausage spice from the butcher in our local grocery store (less than half the price of prepackaged “sportsmen” brands), then proceed to make breakfast sausage, italian sausage, etc... It all comes out excellent. This is probably the best way to make waterfowl into a “usable” meat that's agreeable to the whole family.

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Mike Kallam posted this 04 February 2012

Another thing that I do with all my waterfowl is to soak it over night in a light brine, then change the water and soak it for a few hours in water to get all the blood out before using. Since most waterfowl aren't dead at the shot, especially geese, they are probably full of lactic acid, adrenaline, etc.. Drawing all of this out of the meat is probably a the best thing you can do for the meat. Image what a whitetail would taste like if it had just run 10 miles to get to the corn patch right before you shot it!

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onondaga posted this 04 February 2012

I do the hard part and then ask the cook to do the rest. Here is what works for me cooking Honkers.

First I go to the park and feed them to get them close. Then I beat one to death with a stick by hitting it's head, put it in a bag and rush home. At home I immediately gut it and rinse out the body cavity. The quick gutting and washing rids your dinner of that liver smell mentioned. Next I pluck the bird and wash it again. Then I lightly salt the inner cavity. Quarter 6 -10 little tangy clean, ripe apples and leave the skins on. Jam the goose cavity tight full with the apples. Weigh the goose with the apples in it.

Last I go to the cook with a roll of aluminum foil and the prepared goose and ask her season it like her terrific chicken and wrap it in aluminum foil . The cook knows how many minutes per pound and what temperature to roast the Goose, she just needs to know how much it weighs.

Remove and throw out the apples before bringing the cooked goose to the table.

If you prepare a goose like this It makes a wonderful and delicious meal that is fine enough for company.

I go to the park wearing an orange safety vest and carry a trash bag and poke stick. This makes you look like you are doing community service and works very well.

Gary

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Flashman posted this 04 February 2012

What caliber stick do you use?

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onondaga posted this 13 February 2012

Flashman  :D  The ash broom stick is 100 caliber, length from the ground up is nipple high, and the business end has a 20 penny nail inset and protruding 1.75 inches. The nail is epoxied in place.

Gary

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JSH posted this 18 February 2012

Worst season I have ever had here. Weather was more than mild, almost like spring for darn near all of the season. Same for deer I just got lucky and hit it harder than I had in years.

I find it very interesting of the ones that have “issues” with water fowl. Yes they can be some what on the gamey side, but, only if you let them. In my findings on geese and ducks. Get the dad gum entrails out of them ASAP. Get the body canity opened up and pack with snow. The old gut hook knives that were popular way before my time were made for a reason. When tha locker plant does their processing they don't kill the critter then parade it all over creation in the back of a truck hide guts and all, then gut the thing hours later.

As to the grinding up of goose and or ducks. I used to think that was nuts, but if hunting with a large party of folks and their is an abundance of what ever it does work and is pretty good stuff. LOL, I pluck one maybe two geese a year and that is it. Gent that got me into this years back plucks ALL of his birds even doves..>

I have learned what is what on the wing, so I pick and choose what it is that I am going to make an attempt at killing when the birds cooperate with me. Thos little canadas, we call them cacklers, are terrible, not much bigger than a mallard. Speaking of mallards, I would swap out a mallard for a teal, wood duck or gadwall and be happy myself. jeff

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1kshooter posted this 18 February 2012

JSH, I agree with a lot of what you said! i like teal woodduck and Gadwall better then mallards ..not that I don't like mallard! As for the geese ...when you are wacking the amount of geese that I do...breasting them out becomes a fast and easy thing to do...early season we are allowed 10 birds a day per hunter.. and it is warm out!!!..I brest them out and put the meat on ice in a large camo cooler that comes into the blind!...

just a side note ..I take the hearts out of all the birds and after you cut the top off and then cut into small chunks batter them and fry them up in butter....ummm umm umm! you won't throw them away anymore thats for sure! Jonathan

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gnoahhh posted this 18 February 2012

So that's why our season sucked this year! Those deadeye Canadians waylaid them before they made it down here! Kidding of course. That's an impressive collection of bands too, by the way.

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1kshooter posted this 18 February 2012

thanks bro, we are plauged with them here and there are less and less people hunting them all the time!...I have had days when I have seen 5000 birds within 100 yards of the decoys! most years that I hunt them hard I harvest 200+ birds and make a lot of sausage,jerkey and ground goose/pork blend that we use in lou of ground beef in everything from meatloaf to hamberger helper for a quick meal!...the kids love it and whine when it's gone!

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Reg posted this 16 May 2012

Take only the breast ( no skin ), put in slow cooker with a bit of water in the bottom spice heavily with rosemary, salt and pepper. Cook until tender. Cool breast, cut into strips and lay over a bed of wild rice then cover with a layer of orange marmalade and bake another i/2 hour (350), put on a bit more orange marmalade just before serving. Good stuff. Also works with pheasant. Doves taste funky ? Save only the breast, remove from the breastbone ( use your thumbs, they pop right off ) getting two half breasts. Split one side only of a jalapeno pepper, remove seeds and stuff in one of those 1/2 dove breasts and some cheese. Put on the BBQ until done and serve with a good tossed salad and lots of ice cold beer. Life is good.

:fire

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1kshooter posted this 16 May 2012

Reg, sounds great and I will have to give it a go in 2013 when we finaly get a dove season!....it hurst to see a flock of 50-80 doves straif the goose decoys and not be able to shoot! Jonathan

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Reg posted this 16 May 2012

Tough little targets to shoot at, I miss a lot more than I hit. Normally don't care to eat them but my nephew came up with this one and it really is good.

You say “finally get a dove season ” ? Guess I never imagined there might not be a season up north. Birds sure are there. Have never hunted them but have seen many in Montana especially around the Fort Peck area.

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1kshooter posted this 19 May 2012

Reg, yes next year will be the first dove hunt that I know of in Ontario kind of looking forward to it...the things can't be harder to hit then woodcock in tight cover with your feet stuck in bog lol Jonathan

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JSH posted this 20 May 2012

OMG ,ya have not even shelled any corn yet and your killing geese,lol. If we had it that way down here I would have to put AC in the blind. Not that it would be bad or anything. Spring had sprung here early. I tried turkey hunting for the first time in about 15 years. Dug all my stuff out and the son and I went every night for three weeks and several mornings, nothing. I thought I was a bit rusty until I made a few phone calls. Spoke with some fellows that are pretty hard core and the only one that had any luck was one that took his grandson on the early youth season. One fellow said it was the first time he had been skunked in 20 years. Birds got together early so the say???? jeff

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Reg posted this 06 June 2012

OoooooooK, lets carry this one step further !! From another site, someone is talking of making apricot jam and adding one small can of chipolte peppers that have been run through a blender. This as a glaze on the ol goose should even be better.

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delmarskid1 posted this 06 June 2012

Apricot and chipotle sounds good on ANYTHING!

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kidwalli posted this 04 October 2012

My kids even like it this way:

Grind your goose meat up and mix it about 50/50 with ground pork that has a bit of fat in it. Add a good load of Montreal steak spice in there with a good splash of red wine and lots of chopped onions. Bake as a meatloaf. Or mix 50/50 with ground pork and use as the meat for making tacos.

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LWesthoff posted this 05 October 2012

I have a hunch the taste of waterfowl has a big lot to do with what they've been eating lately. My cousins and I used to bag a teal now and then (not very often) when a small group would land in a neighbor's stock tank. In the very arid southwest, a stock tank is a smallish pond created by damming one of the very rare streams. The ducks were up from the Salton Sea, and were just about inedible.

Up here in Western Washington, where we live now, large flocks of Canadas spent most of the summer grazing in the neighbors 220 acre dairy pasture. The geese considered cow pies a delicacy, and that's exactly what they tasted like. Even the neighbor's Rottweilers wouldn't touch it.

I am. however, very fond of Orange Duck - but I buy it at a good restaraunt (when I feel like I can afford it).

Wes

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