Sumac Mint Iced Tea

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  • Last Post 21 November 2016
delmarskid1 posted this 14 July 2013

Sumac Mint Iced Tea doesn't involve any critters once you have washed the sumac flowers. This part of the forum is a little slow until hunting season starts so I hope you will indulge me.  I sort of remembered from my Boy Scout manual that a kind of lemonade can be made from sumac tops. At our place we have some so I picked a good bunch of the tops that were sticky and shiny with sap. I covered these with an inch of water and put in a good sprig of mint. Brought this to a slow boil and covered it and let it cool while I cut the grass and got the tractor stuck again.  We strained this liquid and added a cup of sugar. Ended up with about a half gallon.  Poured over lots of ice this stuff tastes a little like lemonade but there is a kind of flavor that reminds me of the way pines smell. The mint is good.  If I was a drinking man (again) I'd jack it up with a good gin or rum. Ah well, Dane.

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onondaga posted this 14 July 2013

http://www.castbulletassoc.org/forum/view_user.php?id=348>delmarskid1

Sounds tasty. It is called Poison Sumac for a reason. A small percentage of the population will have a serious reaction to your tea and die within moments of drinking it from suffocation as their airways close from the mild toxin in Poison Sumac.   A dermatologist can do a simple skin test to determine if a particular person has the fatal allergy to your tea.    I have used Sumac pods, well ripened and dark red-brown, dried then pulverized and brewed with 25% Alcohol 75% water to make a dark natural gun stock stain for maple gun stocks.

 I wouldn't drink your tea for money but I have had my Great Aunt's  Pennsylvania Polka Dotted Mushroom Soup as a child and have seen the future.

Gary

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Duane Mellenbruch posted this 14 July 2013

http://www.healing-from-home-remedies.com/sumac-tea.html

Just be informed. Not saying yes, or no.
Duane

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onondaga posted this 14 July 2013

I'm not convinced! I have way too many allergies to risk it!

Gary

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delmarskid1 posted this 14 July 2013

We don't have poison sumac in Wisconsin that I know of. I woke up alive today so I guess ours is okay. poison sumac acts like poison ivy. Poison oak, ivy and sumac all have the same allergen in different strengths. I did a bunch of research when I got into the ivy in a major way.

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madsenshooter posted this 27 February 2015

Good stuff, like you I discovered it in the Boy Scout manual. Most of the other scouts didn't like it, but I did, sorta sweetart tasting. Turns out the berries are pretty high in several medicinal phytochemicals. For me, the price is right!  Late summer is the best time to get the berries.  They're oozing with antioxidants meant to preserve the seeds through the winter.  Might be a good winter weather predictor.  Two summers ago, they oozed a lot of it and we had a very cold winter that hung on late.  Last summer, they oozed very little, like they knew they wouldn't have to preserve the seeds as long.  So far it has panned out, but the winter isn't over yet.

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 27 February 2015

or of course you could pick a few elderberries ... makes terrific wine ...and the very finest jelly for your cornbread .....

Mike H posted this 27 February 2015

Ken Campbell Iowa wrote: or of course you could pick a few elderberries ... makes terrific wine ...and the very finest jelly for your cornbread .....

Ken,      I wouldn't know what an elderberry is,but I do like wine,I buy mine,commercially made from grapes,jelly is called jam,over here,if it wasn't so far from here to the US,I think I would visit you.Tried making cornbread,was nice,but whether it was the same as the US recipe,I don't know. Really enjoy your posts.Mike.

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Hamish posted this 27 February 2015

The first year we tried making Elderberry jelly, we did not get enough thickener into it, We were delighted to find we had syrup that we put on everything from pancakes to ice cream. And, it makes a wonderful addition to just about any mixed drink. (I'm particularly fond of it in Kentuckys finest home distilled product.)

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max503 posted this 21 November 2016

Sumac with the red tops, and poison sumac are two completely different plants.

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