cast in 243 cal

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  • Last Post 10 October 2019
2frogs posted this 02 October 2019

Anyoneknowof any body who makes cast bullets for the 243 cal...Might be interesting to try some in it..But I suppose they would be of gas check design..Thanks for any information onthis..John

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BudHyett posted this 02 October 2019

6 mm BR for Long Range Handgun for several years, was competitive. The two bullets were the RCBS 243-095-SP and SAECO  #243.

Sizing was .244 and .245. Lube was mostly LBT Blue; all trying for 2,300 or 2,400 fps to overcome lower ballistic coefficient. Alloy was monotype, I had one hundred pounds. After using the monotype, linotype was used with water drop from the mold to gain hardness for the velocity above 2,000 fps. .  

I shot the same setup in  a Ruger #1 in 6 mm Remington with good results. Seven or eight shot out of ten would group under one inch with the remaining shots within one and one-half inches. I did not have time to pursue this since the rifle was also used for ground squirrels and fox with jacketed bullets. 

Try it, cast hard these bullets will go over 2,000 fps in my rifles. 

The SAECO mold was a nominal 87 grain, but cast a bullet weighing 93 to 95 grains. The RCBS cast a bullet of the same weight depending on alloy. 

Country boy from Illinois, living in the Magical Pacific Northwest

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GWarden posted this 02 October 2019

I have had excellent results with the RCBS-095-SP in my 6mm Rem. Getting excellent accuracy, last four 5 shot group agg. was .781".  Using IMR4198 powder.

Bob

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Paul Pollard posted this 02 October 2019

Anyone know of any body who makes cast bullets for the 243 cal...Might be interesting to try some in it..But I suppose they would be of gas check design..Thanks for any information onthis..John

 

Here is the only source which I found.

http://www.beartoothbullets.com/bulletselect/index.htm

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Shopdog posted this 03 October 2019

Mid 80's R700V in 6mm. Bought the RCBS 95g. The word minimal dosen't do justice to how little workup I did. Grabbed a handful of cases,put a starting load of 4759 in,result was 15 shots into a ragged hole @100.

I've used it in several 243's since.... with a little more load work,haha.

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Scearcy posted this 05 October 2019

There is an extensive thread from 2-3 years ago that contained testing and discussion. There is a series of 3 articles in the Fouling Shot about 3 years ago as well. The RCBS 95 grain bullet and the NOE 105 gr offering are both good bullets. IMR4198 as mentioned above is a good choice as is 4759. I had some good results with 5744 also. Pay attention to your twist rate and it should be quite easy to get good results.

Great results as GWarden has been getting are harder. I have 2 243s that will shoot sub one inch pretty much on demand and 2 others that absolutely will not.

Jim

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2frogs posted this 07 October 2019

What about the barrel twist for cast bullets..My rifle is one of those savage Axis..

Not sure of the twist..Kilt 2 doe last year with it with factory ammo at 200 yards,

but am interested in using cast now..Maybe not this year but next if possible...

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Brodie posted this 08 October 2019

Why don't you measure the twist in your rifle barrel?

Take a cleaning rod with a TIGHT patch on the end so that it rotates with the twist.  Mark the start with masking tape on the rod,and mark the top of the rod.  Push the rod into the bore until the mark comes up on the same place (on the rifle) where you marked it to start.   Put another piece of tape around the rod at this spot (you should do this at the same reference point on the rifle where you put the first one).  Pull the rod out and measure the distance from the back of the first piece of tape to the front of the second piece.  You now have the twist of your rifle.

B.E.Brickey

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2frogs posted this 08 October 2019

I know the twist..Just wondered if the twist had anything to do with the length of the cast bullet,like they say effects some jacketed bullets..You know the faster the twist they say a longer bullet...Thanks for your kind reply..And that is the same way I do check barrel twists..John

I just hada thought..Where can I get an expander die to expand the necks on the 243 cases to aid in seating the bullets..This can't be done with regular dies can it?

Found my answer  ordered a lee expander die..been years since my casting days..It's coming backto me now..But i'm still gonna but the bullets ..

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 08 October 2019

the Lee expander die ... i use this all the time, as i load mostly a few of each of several different cartridges ... and the expander is kinda universal.

but the Lee expander button is tapered, so really just puts a funnel on the lip of the case ... if the neck is left too tight, it doesn't cure that.  if i am going to load many cases, i make a combination expander and beller button for the lee die ... it is easy to do on a lathe, since it is a solid button ....  now the lyman M die is already shaped that way, except you need a button for each size you want.

for plinking.target, an expander the same diameter of your cast bullet is pretty good ... for hunting, where ammo falling apart is really bad ... make the expander about 1 to 2 thousandths smaller than your cast bullet.

... and lastly, recently there was some posts here about just simply taper reaming your necks ... giving a longer lasting answer to allowing a good start to seating the bullet without distortion.  i think this is good to consider.  suggested was a simple plumber's reamer, available cheap at any hardware.  i suggest doing just a few at first, gently, to find the sweet spot.

hoping this helps... ken

 

 

 

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2frogs posted this 09 October 2019

appreciate it Jim

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shastaboat posted this 10 October 2019

I have found that cast rifle bullets can be fired in fast twist barrels accurately if the velocity is kept at a lower rate.  The faster the twist, the slower the velocity needs to be.  Also in a small diameter bullet less than 7mm then the lower weight bullets are easier to work with at the acceptable velocity.  Long, heavy jacketed bullets need a fast twist and velocity to stabilize but in cast the bullet needs to be slowed down and use a lighter bullet to grab the lands. 

Because I said so!

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shastaboat posted this 10 October 2019

You kind of have this backwards.  In jacketed bullets you need a faster twist barrel to stabilize heavier/longer bullets.  The fast twist barrels will still work fine with lighter jacketed bullets and lighter cast bullets, but at reduced velocity.  But if you have a slower twist barrel, say 1 in 12", it probably won't shoot accurately with long heavy jacketed bullets but velocity can be increased with lighter cast bullets.  Slower twist rate is better with cast bullets as velocity can be increased in the slower twist.  Are we confused yet?

Because I said so!

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shastaboat posted this 10 October 2019

I tried to research the Savage Axis twist rate and found varying answers.  I found references of 1 in 9", 1 in 9.25" and 1 in 9.5".  No info directly from Savage.  Based on the info available and being at least faster than 1 in 10", I would look for a mold lighter than 80 gr and hold the velocity to under 1800 fps.  You might be able to push it up some if casting with a harder alloy.  Have fun!

 

Because I said so!

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