Has/can 357 Magnum and 44-40 WCF be loaded with wadcutter bullets ?

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  • Last Post 05 October 2019
Michael S posted this 03 October 2019

  Does any one know if the 38 call wadcutter cast bullet been loaded in 357 Magnum loads or can it be? I am casting the Lyman 358495 148gr WC plain base bullet casted in Lyman #2 Alloy. My Lyman 4th edition cast bullet handbook does not have load data for WC design but does have load data for 150gr SWC design but does call for bullet to be casted of Linotype.  It would be shot out of revolvers with 2 1/2" , 5" , 8"  barrels and out of a Henry big boy and Marline 1894 cowboy rifles.

   Has the 44-40 WCF even been loaded with a hollow base wadcutter bullet? I would be using the NOE. 215gr hollow base wadcutter bullet and it would be shot out of a New Origional Henry Iron Framed rifle.   Rt now I am casting Lyman #427666 200gr FN plain base casted of Lyman #2 alloy 211.9gr is the 20ct randome average.  I size them to .429 dia 2500 plus lube and loading them with 2400 13.2gr 1035fps  and have good accuracy and no leading.  I have just been itching to load the hollow base wc for it. 

   Different alloy not with standing, does a bullets design play any part in a rounds preshure at round ignition and bullet travel from cylinder to forcing cone and down the barrel? I know bullet design can affect how a bullet travels to its target. 

  If I keep round under 1000fps I use the Carnauba Blue lube over 1000fps I use 2500 Plus lube , rifle and pistol cast bullets . 

GOD, United States of America, US Marine Corps, Family, Self

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delmarskid posted this 03 October 2019

I have loaded 148g wadcutters in the .357 for my revolvers. I seated the same bullet out longer in the .38 special in my model 92 copy. I needed the extra length to make it feed correctly. Bullet shape and alloy type might make a rise in pressure but I don't think I would worry about it. I use jacketed bullet data to load lead bullets a lot. I don't jump right to a hot load but work them up easy. Lever guns seem to need attention about cartridge over all loaded length. I'm not very experienced with them. I would love to get my mitts on one of those Henry Originals.

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M3 Mitch posted this 03 October 2019

I don't see any reason you couldn't use a wadcutter in any cartridge you want.  You don't have to load them down into the brass like a typical .38 wadcutter is generally loaded.  Changing the nose configuration should not affect internal ballistics (much). (Edited to add) You do need to stay pretty close to regulation cartridge overall length for use in the lever actions, though.  Most .357 lever guns will jam if you try to use flush-seated wadcutters in them.

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Eutectic posted this 04 October 2019

Hi Mike,

38 wadcutters work fine in the 357 revolver. If you seat them flush, the seating depth is deeper than a like weight SWC and this raises the pressure. With target velocity < 1000 fs this is not a problem. Seated to the top lube groove the seating depth is similar to the SWC and SWC loads work fine.

Linotype is way too hard for most 357 loads and is likely to cause leading and inaccuracy. Loading manuals many times use the same alloy for everything, makes life simple - for them.  Lino too hard, too expensive, # 2 alloy 5% tin, way too much tin and expensive. See other posts for correct alloy for the pressure level of your load.

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Ed Harris posted this 04 October 2019

As for the .44-40, the neck is only about 0.3 long, and conventional wadcutters intended for the .44 Special when seated deep enough to chamber in a rifle will result in the hollow base being well below the neck, which could result in the skirt upsetting to conform to the bottleneck shoulder, which would raise pressure and probably also result in the skirt failing as the front of the bullet tries to move forward, while the skirt is held back, and the mid-section of the bullet then elongates to the point of ductile fracture.  If shooting these in a revolver where bullets can be seated out, such that the skirt is not below the neck-shoulder junction, it might be worth a try.

The Accurate 43-206H semi-wadcutter was designed especially for the .44-40, produces a clean full-caliber hole in the target, is accurate in both rifle and revolver, and produces factory load velocity with 6 grains of Bullseye.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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Michael S posted this 04 October 2019

  Rt now I only own 1 NOE mould and  Lyman and RCBS moulds. But this is first time I hear of Acc mould brand. I still have water behind my ears.  I'm guessing the 206H means 206gr bullet ?  Does accurate moulds have a web site? I do not see a add in Fouling shot #257 that I am reading today.

GOD, United States of America, US Marine Corps, Family, Self

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M3 Mitch posted this 04 October 2019

I don't know this from experience, but I would think a full wadcutter loaded deep enough to chamber in a 44-40 rifle might result in a cartridge overall length so short that it would not feed from the magazine - and in fact would probably cause a "one and a half" feed, where one short round and the nose of the next round enter the carrier, requiring pretty extensive disassembly of the rifle to clear it.

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BigMan54 posted this 05 October 2019

I've loaded that same Lyman bullet cast of COWW's in a .357Mag case as part of my "Pressure step down" in .357Mag cases.  #358495 weighs 146grs and is loaded in .357Mag cases over 3.5grs of Bullseye until the primer falls out or the case mouth cracks. 

 

Long time Caster/Reloader, Getting back into it after almost 10yrs. Life Member NRA 40+yrs, Life S.A.S.S. #375. Does this mean a description of me as a fumble-fingered knuckle-draggin' baboon. I also drool in my sleep. I firmly believe that true happiness is a warm gun. Did I mention how much I HATE auto-correct on this blasted tablet.

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Ed Harris posted this 05 October 2019

  Rt now I only own 1 NOE mould and  Lyman and RCBS moulds. But this is first time I hear of Acc mould brand. I still have water behind my ears.  I'm guessing the 206H means 206gr bullet ?  Does accurate moulds have a web site? I do not see a add in Fouling shot #257 that I am reading today.

 

http://www.accuratemolds.com/catalog.php?page=all

Link to Accurate molds above.  Each mold is made to order, not made ahead and stocked.  The descriptors are nominal caliber, weight and last name initial of the designer.  Steve Hurst's and my molds are H along with Henry Hillbilly and who knows who else.  Modifications of existing designs may have a second letter, if somebody added a bevel base or GC.  Any of the designs on the web site can be tailored to fit your gun as to as-cast dimensions in your alloy.  Delivery is about 3 weeks. 

IMHO sure beats the heck out of "Group Buys" on some of the other forums where you must wait months to get somebody else's design that fits their gun and probably won't fit yours...

Normal manufacturing tolerance is 0.002".  Best practice is to do a pound cast of your chamber, specify diameter to the EXACT size of your pound cast, and then specify DIAMETER TOLERANCE NEGATIVE.  Then as-cast bullets will all enter and be a close fit, even after they age and "grow" a bit. 

If ordering the same mold to use in several guns specify DIAMETER TOLERANCE CENTERED and bullets will be +/- 0.001 from the specified diameter.

Or as many people do, just realize that bullets may drop up to a maximum of +0.002" and so order your mold 0.002" LESS than the pound cast and bullets will not cast smaller than that, but the normal positive tolerance will work to your advantage as to fit.

It IS important to specify the alloy you intend to use, as that influences diameter as well as weight.  

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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