M 10 REVOLVERS

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  • Last Post 30 September 2018
joeb33050 posted this 15 September 2018

I bought 2 M10 4" S&W revolvers from Bud's, ex French police force, 4" barrel. Why 2? $269, but still, why 2?

The rubber grip doesn't allow pulling the hammer back, it's in the way, so double action only. I'd like to buy

regular grips and try them.

 

 

 

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joeb33050 posted this 15 September 2018

The mainspring screw was cranked way in, I unscrewed it to a reasonable pull, and now test for fail to fire, and turned in 1/4 turn on FTF. Both firing all primers now. Is this the right way to adjust?

 

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joeb33050 posted this 15 September 2018

The cylinder notches have been ?swaged?. All notches, both guns. Never saw this before.

 

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joeb33050 posted this 15 September 2018

Both shoot well, Thanks, Dave.

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max503 posted this 15 September 2018

You say Bud's has them?  I've never bought a gun online.  How do you go about it?

Edit: Just went to their website.  They have a cool CZ 9mm.

Double Edit:  Been shopping on the website.  They have an FFL dealer in my town.  I may be doing some shopping...…….

 

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Ed Harris posted this 15 September 2018

Joe,

Strain screw is not used to adjust trigger pull.  It should be turned all the way down.

If you back it off and don't get misfires you might get away with it, but it isn't recommended practice.

I find your battered locking bolt notches disturbing.  It looks like the gun has been abused shooting DA with the cylinder out of time and the bullet entering the forcing cone is forcefully aligning the cylinder and buggering the notches.  The French police revolvers I've seen have seen heavy use and were not as well maintained as US guns.  

Read Dave Reiss's article in The Fouling Shot 246-18 on S&W tune up.

The reason for buying two is the "New York Reload."  

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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delmarskid posted this 15 September 2018

Sometimes people peen the cylinder stops to tighten things when they get shot loose. Others back out the strain screw to lighten the double action. They then measure the amount of he screw head standing above the grip and file that amount off of the screw where it contacts the spring and tighten the screw till it bottoms. I'm one for buying a lighter spring kit.

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David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 16 September 2018

The peened cylinder stop notches is an amatuer way of tightening the lock up. Very Bubbaish. It is proper to slightly file the end of the strain screw to lighten the pull, but it must always be tighten all the way. However that is only one part of lightening the trigger pull. Spring kits are not recommended because they are not always guaranteed to give proper ignition. 

The grips can be cut away at where the hammer meets it to remedy the problem. 

Joe if you have more casting equipment to trade I will do a professional action job on the model 10, replacing any minor parts. I probably have a cylinder and grips for replacements.

 

 

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
- Also deal in: Land, Banjos, Nails, Firearms, Manure, Fly Swatters, Used Cars, Whisky, Racing Forms, Rare Antiquities, Lead, Used Keyboard Keys, Good Dogs, Pith Helmets & Zulu Headdresses. .

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joeb33050 posted this 16 September 2018

Thanks, David, I bought these pistols as fully functional but well worn; and don't have the ability to use an improved gun. I'm looking for an alternative to serious group shooting, pistols and rimfire are more fun.

There is no stop on the mainspring screw that I can find, both screw heads were ?1/16"-1/8" below the frame. Way below. Now about flush.

The old time cast bullet forum, run by "the colonel", had a wizard who explained at great length about peening cylinder notches to improve accuracy. I believed him, never found him wrong and he taught me a lot. He's long gone.

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Ed Harris posted this 16 September 2018

Dave,

If you need a K-frame cylinder to repair one of Joe's guns I have one I'd be willing to donate to the cause. 

I would have to measure and look it over, it dates from the 1980s. PM me if you need it. 

Also have a strain screw and misc. small parts.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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joeb33050 posted this 20 September 2018

Dave,

If you need a K-frame cylinder to repair one of Joe's guns I have one I'd be willing to donate to the cause. 

I would have to measure and look it over, it dates from the 1980s. PM me if you need it. 

Also have a strain screw and misc. small parts.

Thanks, Ed, I've shot both twice again, 48 shots per and no misfires. One shoots to aim point, other 6" left and 3" low. These are $269 guns, look a bit sad but work fine. With trifocals, long range, front sight is a ghost and 25 yard target is clear. Bottom lens, front sight is clear and target is blurry and my neck hurts with head way back. I don't remember this problem when I was 32. And K22, 32, 38s were $81.

 

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Ed Harris posted this 22 September 2018

Joe,

It warms my furry little heart to see you enjoying wheelies again.  Nice not having to chase brass.

 

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 22 September 2018

Ed: ... ya might have something there ...  after a couple years of frantically yanking the last 10 rounds out of my 92 beretta forever-clip .... .,... even though my hand is cramping and my eyes de-focusing ....  can't stop, rambo always runs the belt out ...

i recently enjoyed a leisurely shootout with a friend ... my ruger security six and his colt police ... 38 spec., popgun wadcutters make a great looking hole in a pop can ....   and the brass falls out nicely right back into our hands ...

i had forgotten the magic of my first farmboy handgun ... a 22 revolver  ...    maybe if you aim the first one, you might not need the next 15 .....

ken, thinking i need to load up another thousand rounds of 38 special ...

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Eutectic posted this 24 September 2018

So nice to see another convert to the wheel gun community.

If you want a lighter pull get a Wolfe spring kit. A lighter rebound spring is also helpful. If you worry about misfires, use the Ed Harris method - load 100 rounds with small rifle primers. If they all go bang you are good to go. Don't worry about overpressure just use target loads. If you get any misfires you need a heavier mainspring.

Put Locktight on the strain screw and run it in all the way, I have had them work loose, this does cause misfires.

From the Back Streets, where the deer and the antelope eat your flower garden and the good shooting is far far away.

Steve

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Ed Harris posted this 24 September 2018

Primer choice is important for reliable ignition in DA revolvers.

Federal 100s and Remington 1-1/2 are the softest and were favored by PPC target shooters back in the day.

Norma primers were also highly prized, but not common today.

Winchester WSP will be 100% reliable in a stock revolver action producing 0.010" copper indent on the .225"x.400 size "C" government copper in the correct gage holder.  Tuned target actions producing 0.009" Cu indent will misfire 1 in 100.

CCI primers of many years ago in the Korean and Vietnam era had plated steel cups and were "hard."  I don't believe they have used these in many years, but  would check older CCI primers with a magnet.  They work find in .357s and .38s with strong actions and heavy trigger pulls producing 0.011 Cu indent, which S&W Model 10s, COlts and Rugers back in the day would do out of the box. 

The "lead free" primers used in Speer Lawman range ammo are less sensitive, about like the Federal 200.

Federal 200 primers used to be identified as "Small Rifle and Magnum Pistol", having a 0.0185+0.0015/-0.000 base metal thickness of the primer cup, vs. 0.015" for the Federal 100.  I use these in action testing because doing so is easier and cheaper than the government method.  The gages are expensive and the coppers not sold to the gunsmith trade, being available only to the Government and its contractors.  The last time I bought any the minimum order was 1000 copper at $1 each, and that was back in 1987!

The Federal 200 is similar in cup thickness, anvil point geometry and its "all-fire" vs. "none fire" drop ball test height as the military 9mm primer and US .30 Carbine primer.  If you want to test your revolver action as to its suitability for defense carry using +P loads, just prime 100 sized cases with clean primer pockets with Federal 200s.  Pop 100 of them.  If you get a single misfire, repeat the test, accept on 1, reject on 2 in 200.

73 de KE4SKY In Home Mix We Trust From the Home of Ed's Red in "Almost Heaven" West Virginia

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joeb33050 posted this 30 September 2018

With a new set of feeler gauges, I measured the cylinder/barrel gap on both revolvers, many, many times.

 

M 10 38 SPL PISTOLS

 

BARREL/CYLINDER GAP, .001”, DOUBLE ACTION ALL 6 CHAMBERS

 

MODEL 10-8, “A” ON LEFT SIDE FRAME

 

BRASS IN CYLINDER, ACCEPT 5, REFUSE 6  

 

NO BRASS IN CYLINDER, ACCEPT 7, REFUSE 8  

 

 

 

MODEL 10-6

 

BRASS IN CYLINDER, ACCEPT 4, REFUSE 5  

 

NO BRASS IN CYLINDER, ACCEPT 5, REFUSE 6  

"REFUSE" IS FEELER WON'T GO IN GAP; OR; FEELER GOES IN GAP BUT DA CYCLING CYLINDER STOPS ON A CHAMBER-WON'T ROTATE.

 

These seem like very good numbers, nyet?

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