M10 AND TRIPLE LOCK LOCKUP

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joeb33050 posted this 2 weeks ago

I'm not much of a pistol guy, so, would someone explain how an M10 cylinder locks in place, and how a S&W Triple lock cylinder locks? And where the force comes from trying to open the cylinder, necessitating the locking? Pictures would help, greatly.

Thanks;

joe b.

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David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 2 weeks ago

The cylinder only locks with the cylinder stop in the cylinder notches. The lock-up of the model 10 and the triple lock actually refers to the locking up of the whole cylinder assembly including the yoke.

The places the model 10 lock-up is where the center rod enters the recoil plate and at the other end where the ejector rod engages the locking bolt under the barrel.

The triple lock adds a third place. This is on the crane where it engages the frame with a another locking bolt.

If this does not explain, I can come up with photos.  

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
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joeb33050 posted this 1 weeks ago

Colt pistols don't lock the extractor rod at the front. Is theirs a different system?

Thanks;

joe b.

 

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David Reiss CBA Membership Director posted this 1 weeks ago

Colt revolvers are a total different animal. Without going into a lot of detail, they are much more finely tuned than a S&W. Hence the theory that Colts were always know for their accuracy and Smiths for their ruggedness. Colts used parts that are harder and hold their tolerances better, but at the cost of failure if one part loses that tight fit.  

Colt's lock up the cylinder with the cylinder stop and the hand, hence the old saying they lock up as "tight as a bank vault". On a Smith the hand has no part in locking up the cylinder. On a Smith the cylinder stop comes up much sooner and drags on the cylinder wall. On a Colt, the stop comes up at almost the last second as the hand takes a firm hold of the ratchet on the cylinder, imagine holding the cylinder pinching it between your forefinger and thumb. 

David Reiss - NRA Life Member & PSC Range Member Retired Police Firearms Instructor/Armorer
-Services: Wars Fought, Uprisings Quelled, Bars Emptied, Revolutions Started, Tigers Tamed, Assassinations Plotted, Women Seduced, Governments Run, Gun Appraisals, Lost Treasure Found.
- Also deal in: Land, Banjos, Nails, Firearms, Manure, Fly Swatters, Used Cars, Whisky, Racing Forms, Rare Antiquities, Lead, Used Keyboard Keys, Good Dogs, Pith Helmets & Zulu Headdresses. .

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RicinYakima posted this 6 days ago

Joe, are you asking how the yoke/crane locks up for your project? The Smith used the little rod that comes out the back of the cylinder into the frame and the pin under the barrel goes back into the ejector rod. The Colt uses a pin into the frame, but also the cylinder rotation locks by the hand pushing the cylinder into the closed position against the cylinder stop. The Smith hand is trying to open the cylinder. Smiths, even with both, do only an OK job of keeping the yoke closed. For your project, you have to find something else beside just the one pin in the back.

Ed Harris gave you the best answer, a Powers yoke lock installed. Or design an locking attachment that will swing out of the way to open the yoke, and then lock into place for firing.

HTH, Ric

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joeb33050 posted this 5 days ago

Joe, are you asking how the yoke/crane locks up for your project? The Smith used the little rod that comes out the back of the cylinder into the frame and the pin under the barrel goes back into the ejector rod. The Colt uses a pin into the frame, but also the cylinder rotation locks by the hand pushing the cylinder into the closed position against the cylinder stop. The Smith hand is trying to open the cylinder. Smiths, even with both, do only an OK job of keeping the yoke closed. For your project, you have to find something else beside just the one pin in the back.

Ed Harris gave you the best answer, a Powers yoke lock installed. Or design an locking attachment that will swing out of the way to open the yoke, and then lock into place for firing.

HTH, Ric

 

Yes, it's about the rifolver, planning and sketching is happening-and the search for a machinist is under way.

Thanks;

joe b.

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delmarskid posted this 5 days ago

Joe a good machinist shouldn't have much trouble hanging an anchor for the ejector rod and putting the detent ball at the crane too.

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