Mauser Problem Child

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  • Last Post 21 February 2019
x101airborne posted this 15 February 2019

I was wondering if anyone here might give me some advice....

I bought a mauser bolt rifle made up in 6.5-06 from a member of another forum. I put it in the safe for a year and since I have recently had my shoulder operated on, I thought now would be a convenient time to get it set up and load some ladder loads. Problem is, when I went to test feed some dummy rounds to test function, they would not chamber; the rifle has NO throat! I did watch the rounds coming out of the magazine to make sure they were under the extractor. I also chambered several empty cases and they chambered well. I got my dummy rounds again and coated a bullet with machinist layout blue and sure enough, they were marked evenly around the bullet right at the beginning of the ogive. To compound this, there is no radius cut at the breach of the chamber on the barrel to allow the rounds to smoothly feed into the chamber without hanging up on the case mouth. 

I can buy a throating reamer cheap enough, but I don't have ANY experience doing this. And I don't have any idea on how to cut the chamber feed radius without pulling the barrel. I don't have any tools that would allow me to do this safely. 

Any help?

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R. Dupraz posted this 15 February 2019

Not much help here except for given what you described, and if you have a professional GS's within reasonable distance, in the end, it may be more cost effective to have him  fix that Mauser. I am lucky in that there are two within thirty minutes of my house. If so, he may already have a throating reamer and the necessary tooling.

I know that there are a couple of forum members that can no doubt offer other valid alternatives.

Only my opinion and we all know what they are worth. Good luck

 

R. 

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x101airborne posted this 15 February 2019

Thank you.

I have some solid copper (guilding metal) Barnes bullets. I was wondering if affixing one to a rod and imbedding it with lapping compound, maybe I could throat this barrel in. I don't know if that is a good idea, so I am only asking about the validity of the thought. Of course that still doesn't fix the barrel tennon. 

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RicinYakima posted this 15 February 2019

Bad idea. Throat will be oval and not inline with the bore, so there is no alternative other than a throating reamer. I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news. The rear of the barrel chamfer is doable with hand tools a 45 degree cutter.

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x101airborne posted this 15 February 2019

I would rather take bad news than a botched up job that turns out unusable. 

Im a really straight forward kind of guy with thick skin. No worries on my end. 

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x101airborne posted this 15 February 2019

Anyone ever throated a barrel by hand before? Advice?

I really don't want to learn from a YouTube video that says "Oh yeah, just go for it, it'll be fine.."

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Ken T posted this 15 February 2019

The throating reamer has a pilot.You'll need an extension for the reamer to be run thru the action.Depending on the reamer a reversed socket extension will work.You can also make an extension with  thin wall tubing and  setscrews.Keep the reamer centered in the receiver and you'll have no problem.Check the cut frequently as throating reamer cuts very easily.

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RicinYakima posted this 15 February 2019

X, they are almost always done by hand. Like Ken T said you will need the right handle and extension, but those are once in a lifetime purchases. Also good cutting oil and lots of it as you will be cut, clean and try a lot. Since this is a "feel" skill rather than a "see" skill, you may need to practice some first. GO SLOW.    

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BudHyett posted this 15 February 2019

This is a home project if you feel you can do the work. You might want to ask a machinist friend to help on the first try, he should be able to immediately grasp the concept and advise.

As the answers above state; plenty of cutting oil and a thorough cleaning for each check. And when you think you are almost perfect, quit. Shoot the rifle in trials to see what the actual results are. This was a hard lesson for me, there is no  tool to put .010 back on the throat. . 

Note: In my experience, I load ten dummy rounds and use a fresh dummy round for each check.

Country boy from Illinois, living in the Magical Pacific Northwest

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x101airborne posted this 15 February 2019

Thank yall. 

Brownells, here I come!

Any interest in a slightly used 6.5 throating reamer?

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BudHyett posted this 15 February 2019

Look here also: http://pacifictoolandgauge.com/512-chamber-reamers-gauges-cutters

Country boy from Illinois, living in the Magical Pacific Northwest

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RicinYakima posted this 15 February 2019

You can usually get about 75% of initial cost back on evil bay.

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corerftech posted this 16 February 2019

Some reamers avail now have a very short throat for varmint bullets. You may have a throat but be forced to use a small light jacketed bullet.

A dummy round with your desired bullet seated to a “length” will be needed to hand throat and so so with any precision. Layout blue on dummy, watching for the bullet to stop seating. Dummy should be .010 seated shallow to allow you to engrave or kiss at your desired full length. That way you stop short of desired depth. It’s a small cut and test while closing bolt on dummy. Many dummies may be needed since you’ll be seating them as tests deeper than desired until you hit your mark. Bullet profile selected will have a large bearing on the depth of your throat. Make a good decision on your dummy or uuull have it too deep.

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x101airborne posted this 16 February 2019

Thank you for the advice.

 

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singleshot posted this 16 February 2019

Another thing I do when throating is take a fire formed case and open the primer pocket up to fit the reamer shank. Slip it over the shank and chamber the case, then cut the throat. This helps tremendously in maintaining alignment of the reamer. A locking collar can also be fitted to control the depth.

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x101airborne posted this 16 February 2019

That is an awesome idea.

So for an idiot (me), Fireform a case with a small charge of pistol powder with something like Cream Of Wheat on top, just enough to get the case to swell in the chamber then drill the case out?

That is my guess but I have never done it so pardon my excessively detailed questions. I am just wanting to not create more damage than I can fix.

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x101airborne posted this 16 February 2019

I looked into some things and think that I should order the Hornady OAL measuring device for a caliper so I can measure what OAL I am really throating to. At least if I can make up a couple dummy rounds and have a measurement to know, this length chambers now, this one next and so on. 

Thoughts?

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 16 February 2019

good advice above.

i stress that you might not even feel the throater cutting.. and the chips look like fly poop ...  .... so the set-screwed stop bushing idea i highly recommend ... you could stack washers on the reamer shank and remove one at a time per plunge  ...  and remove chips before you try your test cartridge .

you can also rent throaters for a week  ... that kinda makes you want to hurry though ... not good for the first time on anything.  but throating is pretty easy as long as you don't go deeper than you wanted.

on the chamber bevel ... go very slow, use the very least that works... if you can see any shiney at all, stop and try that ... and it might be more your action guide rails that need a little work to deliver the cartridge better to the chamber.  chamber from the magazine slowly and see if you can improve that.  

sounds like a great project ... when you get done you will have a great rifle, and the 6.5 creedmore guys will bow in your very presence ... hah ...

oh, the original 6.5/ 264 Winchester Mag. bullets had a reduced diameter front section ....  just some trivia ...  

further, if you are going to shoot only cast bullets, it might be interesting to play with that no-throat for a while ....  there was a guy named Neidner that did pretty well with something like that a hundred years ago ...  seems he had a 25-06 long before anybody else had one ... they say ...  anyway his system was nearly all bore-rider and a short groove dia. at the back.

good luck, and keep us up on wha hoppen ...ken

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x101airborne posted this 16 February 2019

Thanks guys. Much appreciated

 

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shastaboat posted this 18 February 2019

Remember it is easy to go too far.  Throating is quite easy and doesn't take much force or very many turns.  I like to throat the length of the caliber.  So for a 6.5 caliber around .260 to .270 is plenty deep.

Because I said so!

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x101airborne posted this 19 February 2019

Thank you Sir.

I will definitely use a mechanical stop.

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