Rifle Accuracy Facts, H. Vaughn

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RicinYakima posted this 27 February 2017

 

Rifle Accuracy Facts

 

Harold Vaughn

 

1998 Copyright Precision Shooting, Inc. (Hardback); 2000 Copyright (Soft cover)

 

Vaughn does most of the work in the book with a Remington 721 in .270 Winchester with 90 and 120 grain jacketed bullets. Why, you would ask, would that be relevant to a cast bullet shooter? The answer is that it is not that gets his .270 to shoot ¼ MOA groups at 200 yards with hunting bullets, but how he does it.

 

Looking at the pictures, it appears that he worked on this process for over 20 years. And he shares what works and doesn’t make us read about all the things that didn’t work. When he gets to the end with the .270, he starts with the 6 mm PPC and then a rail gun in 6 mm BR. Everything is backed up with instrumented data, that he tells you how to build, programs to run on your computer and more than I cannot really use. But he destroys many myths: molybdenum disulfide does nothing but cool powder gases and reduces pressure, weighting jacketed bullets closer than 1% is a waste of time compared to working on seating depth and (my favorite) the Remington 700 barrel mounting system is the worst possible way to put a barrel on an action. Scope mounting, bedding and tinkering are all covered in the book.

 

The book is a cult favorite of barrel makers, custom action makers and do it yourself gunsmiths. Every process is detailed about to making a rifle shoot. So even though it doesn’t even mention cast bullets, the principles are the same. My engineer friends tell me the appendixes are worth the cost of the book on how to build and set up the instrumentation to gather data.

 

The only flaw with the book is that it is out of print. Used paperback copies sell for about $300 and mint condition hard backs in the $700+ range. You will have to post bond, your oldest son, to borrow a copy.

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RicinYakima posted this 27 February 2017

Picture of the back cover.

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JeffinNZ posted this 01 March 2017

I have a copy.  Pretty heavy reading in places.  Good but very technical.

Cheers from New Zealand

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SierraHunter posted this 01 March 2017

I love reading anything gun related, but that's way to steep for me.

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RicinYakima posted this 01 March 2017

I bought a copy from an antique mall that had a book stall. I got three 1930's Ideal loading manuals and Rifle Accuracy Facts for a total of $20. It is about the hunt as well as the kill. Add this to the treasures out there to be found.

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R. Dupraz posted this 01 March 2017

Recently finished reading one of  my shootin buddies hard cover copy. Trying to decide whether to give another go or not. Wonder how much of the information if any, would apply to cast loads given their much lower pressure.

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lotech posted this 01 March 2017

I bought this book some time ago. Certainly some very useful information, but as I recall, “very technical” is an understatement regarding some of the material. I don't have the math, engineering, and ballistics background to fully appreciate the author's work. 

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RicinYakima posted this 02 March 2017

R. That is the question I ask myself! We shoot about 1/3 the pressure of the jacket bullet group. Is the mechanical stress then 1/3 or 1/9 that problem? The non-shooting, mechanical part, i.e. chambering and bedding and scope problems, I found  to be very accurate and worth the time to do building or remodeling a rifle. Ric

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Ken Campbell Iowa posted this 02 March 2017

since the barrel vibration tuning works for the 1000 fps 22 rf, i spose that part of the magic applies to 1600 fps cast loads also.

simply, there are two major areas ( in cast also ) to worry us: ( assuming identical loads and ignition )

1) the bullet is deformed by the time it exits the barrel.

2) the barrel is pointing in different directions from shot to shot ... vibrations and bedding,

seems real simple ( g ) .

ken

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Eutectic posted this 08 March 2017

I have had a copy for years, I reread it about once a year. If your gunsmith does not have a copy, find another gunsmith.

Seriously, this is one of the best books on rifle accuracy available. Yes, it is all jacketed bullets, and yes a lot of it applies to cast bullet guns. If you are interested in rifle accuracy or just want to know what to tell your gunsmith, you should read this book.

Look past the math used to evaluate, read the results, what works and what does not and you will get a lot out of this book.

 

Steve 

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joeb33050 posted this 09 March 2017

I have had a copy for years, I reread it about once a year. If your gunsmith does not have a copy, find another gunsmith.

Seriously, this is one of the best books on rifle accuracy available. Yes, it is all jacketed bullets, and yes a lot of it applies to cast bullet guns. If you are interested in rifle accuracy or just want to know what to tell your gunsmith, you should read this book.

Look past the math used to evaluate, read the results, what works and what does not and you will get a lot out of this book.

 

Steve 

 

 

Why don't you save us a lot of time and money, and tell us the important things that Harold found that affect accuracy?

joe b.

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