something stupid that worked

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  • Last Post 20 January 2017
delmarskid posted this 09 January 2017

Hello, and thanks for looking. As the title says I tried something that I thought was stupid and probably would not work. It did work. It seems to work well in fact. I have been shooting and loading for my new .327 single seven. It shoots well and I like it a lot. What I tried was this. I make gas checks with the Free-chex arbor press type tool. Love the thing, never out of checks again. My new mold for the 327 is a 105g plain base bullet. The 327 is capable of driving this little thing nearly 1500 fps. Not a good scenario for keeping the plating down in my bore. I got a little at 1200 after 150 rounds. It pushed right out with a tight dry flannel patch. What I tried was this, I seated an aluminum home made check in the case mouth and seated the plain based bullet on top of it. I did a fit try on a sized and flared case first. These are straight walled cases of course so the check didn't fall in or twist crooked. I loaded four cylinders full yesterday and fired them all at 25 yards to check for function and accuracy. My first seven shot group looked pretty wide. It was about six inches. I fired fourteen at the next and the group was about four inches. My third target got the last seven and it was a little over two inches discounting the one that I yanked down. I do that shooting off hand, recoil compensation I guess. Today I was encouraged enough to load 150 and bump the load by .7g. to 7.2g of AA no.5 This is still 1.g under max.  My shooting started at 150 yards and it was a bust. Today in the land of bratwurst and cheese hats it was about 10 degrees with a 10 mile per hour wind. This makes about zero with wind chill. I moved up to 25 paces and took my time and watched my trigger pulling. I got a couple of groups at around 2". I moved to 10 yards and fired at a bullet hole in the white. This got me clover leafs. I went back to 25 paces again with bounding confidence and got nice 2” groups with some cutting a chew hole. I looked all over the ground both days and found no checks on the ground or in my skin. Anybody else tried this?

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RicinYakima posted this 09 January 2017

Before I bought a gas checked mould (357156) I would load copper gas checks upside down in 357 cases. It would stop leading, but accuracy was worse. I'm glad this is working for you, and keep up the experiments!! Ric

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delmarskid posted this 10 January 2017

I'm waiting to find one of these after it's been fired. I think that they must be swaged on to the base.

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delmarskid posted this 10 January 2017

I think I need to add that I am not inverting the gas checks. They are going in the case just as if they were seated on a bullet. 

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RicinYakima posted this 10 January 2017

You would think that they would be “firmly affixed” after firing! Keep looking, I am curious.

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delmarskid posted this 16 January 2017

I've fired a couple hundred of these left handed gas check loads. I've found two of the checks on the ground total. I've dug or rather examined my berm for bullets and picked up a few. I found no checks on any of the bullets nor have I seen evidence of the checks ever being attached to the bullets. The checks that I picked up are flattened and have a print of the sprues stamped into them. I took pictures but I can't post because the pics use too many bits.

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delmarskid posted this 19 January 2017

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RicinYakima posted this 19 January 2017

It appears the outside standing edge was supported by the bullet and the unsupported center collapsed?

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Notlwonk posted this 19 January 2017

I've used the inverted checks many times over the years, mainly in hand guns. An important note!!! do not used if the case gets larger on the inside. The check does stop leading and it may or may not improve accuracy, try different loads. When loading, I wipe the base of the bullet to so that the check doesn't stick to the bullet. Currently my only load like this is in the Trapdoor. Lyman 457122 with the HP pin replaced to get a solid bullet and smokeless. The checks can be found anywhere from 5 yds. ( they get beat up when landing at this distance ) out to 40-50 yards and they do disperse to the sides. The found ones are usually good enough condition to get reused.  I still get flyers sometimes and wonder if maybe the checks don't always fall off. While writing this a thought of using a milk jug or juice carton wad between the bullet and check occurred to me. Sounds like another experiment for warmer weather.

I competed in a practical pistol match with a 1911 years back using the checks behind some too soft bullets and the close targets showed 2 holes per shot. The Match director was baffled!!

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delmarskid posted this 20 January 2017

 

It appears the outside standing edge was supported by the bullet and the unsupported center collapsed?

Hi Ric, I'm pretty sure that is what is happening. The flat of the check gets blown up against the base like a paper cup hit with a hammer. I cleaned after 125 rounds shot one after the other in an hour or so and got no leading. I don't know if store bought gilding metal checks will act the same. I will drop or place one in a case and see how they fit before I try them. My aluminum checks are large enough to need a little pressure to fit the mouth of the case. 

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RicinYakima posted this 20 January 2017

Changing materials and techniques will change results, that is a certainty. It looks effective to me for your goals.

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